HELP WANTED

Real Estate Appraisers

REQUIREMENTS

Active appraiser license, preferably certified, a computer, appraisal software, MLS, E&O insurance, dependable vehicle, camera, smart phone, a background check (by us) because the one your state requires every year is just not good enough and good communication skills (see smart phone requirement).

JOB DESCRIPTION

You will be responsible to perform valuations subject to 30 pages of requirements set forth in the engagement letter. We will require availability always to answer our redundant calls and emails.

Special note: if you live in ND and have a license in GA, TX, and NJ you qualify for our special desktop hybrids and never have to visit a property site again.

Using your smartphone, assignments will be broadcast at fees WE determine acceptable for the area. The fee is non-negotiable as we have included our special fee in addition to your fee and cannot go back to the lender/client for more money. All jobs will be bid out to our panel of appraisers and those who accept the assignment first will get the order (so make sure you are quick and have that smart phone or tablet with you at all times to accept the orders).

On occasion, we will ask for a fee and turn time to build an AMC C&R survey. Jobs are assigned to the lowest fee and fastest turn time submitted to us. You don’t have to be located near the subject property but reports are required within 48 hours. Nearby proximity to a subject property and expertise are not important factors.

Upon completion, please be available at all times to answer superfluous stipulations to meet UAD or address all value reconsiderations or sales sent to us by the lender, realtor or any party that believes your opinion of value is not high enough.

COMPENSATION

DO NOT INCLUDE INVOICE WITH APPRAISAL REPORTS. We do not accept invoices this way by our team members. Upon completion, we will send you your payment in 30-days or more, depending on your state AMC regulations and rules.

COMPANY MISSION AND VISION

Our mission is to maintain infinite client satisfaction.

If you feel that you can meet the job description, send your resume, three sample appraisals, your driver’s license, bank account info, credit check and health history.

AMC

Unintended Consequences, USA

Weird Science

Remember the movie Weird Science where the two guys develop technology to make a doll real? If you’re my age, I’m sure you do. If not get to googling Kelly LeBrock.  

She did some amazing things. She looked great, was sexy and had odd powers that turned the older brother into a pile of emoji poop. Weird huh? Everything about her was amazing on the outside, but something was weird. That’s how I feel about new technologies that AMCS, Zillow and others have offered the public. On the outside, it looks great but what’s really happening on the inside?

I’ve seen examples of this technology when it comes to appraisals. They claim to be faster, cheaper and accurate but even Zillow’s owner’s home price was way off base. Let me explain to you just how inaccurate this is.

Many of these companies rely on dirty data i.e. tax records and other public data that isn’t always accurate or vetted. What happens when you put an addition on your house, but the tax office missed that after the sale? Or that you’ve completely renovated your home? Maybe the neighbor hasn’t renovated in twenty years and the interior is falling apart. How can unverified data be superior to trained experts who are on site? Dependency on technology sites that produce and profit from bad information is dangerous.

Here’s another example how bad data works, because lets face it even you aren’t being fully honest.  Say I said my car was in good condition on Kelley Blue Book when it’s only fair condition. What I see as good is not necessarily what a neutral professionally trained individual would see. If I use the wrong data when I go sell, that car will result in disappointment. The same applies to big data in real estate. On the upside, it goes the other way, too. Home sellers don’t want to leave money on the table.  

Lenders and AMCS developed this technology, using unvetted data, to stream line your appraisal process making it cheaper and faster. That sounds good on the surface and some data is correct but as an appraiser, I often find mistakes in the data, big mistakes and lots of them. This is not an isolated extreme; it’s happening everywhere, and consumers need to be wise and sharp when it comes to cheap and fast.

Ask yourself these questions: did anyone come see your fabulous remodel? Did anyone accurately measure your home and new addition? Do these sites know the area or the surrounding amenities that help drive markets? If the answer to any of these is NO, then how confident are you knowing your net worth is being valued properly by these new technologies? 

While technology is great in many ways and helped many areas of the appraisal profession, trying to determine your value based on sites like Zillow or an AMC hybrid is a risk in and of itself.

As a home buyer, seller, or if refinancing, it’s worth your attention to verify the sources and validity of your value estimates. The best way to truly know your net worth is to hire an appraiser who is independent of banks and AMCs and can give you that neutral, unbiased, on site and verified service.

What’s not in your wallet?

Before the housing collapse, when applying for a loan, you would go to your bank or mortgage broker and apply. Upon approval, they would explain the property would be appraised by a real estate appraiser and as the borrower, the cost of the appraisal was to the borrower (even though the appraisal is for the lender). The appraiser would either bill the lender the cost of the appraisal or coordinate payment when the appraiser was at the house. Sometimes, the lender would pay for it and roll it into your mortgage and all was said and done. The appraiser would most likely be on the lenders list of approved appraisers and had a professional working relationship with the lender and as a borrower, you knew exactly how much was paid for the appraisal and to whom it was paid.

Fast forward to post crisis and today. When buying a property, do you know how much you are paying for an appraisal? Does your lender have a professional relationship with the appraiser? The answer is typically no, but how can this even be you ask? We know how much we pay for other services, we know their experiences, shouldn’t appraisals be the same? Well, it should be but it’s not and this is why……

Post crisis, appraisers were blamed for almost everything, the crash, high and low values, the weather, super bowl losses and pretty much everything wrong under the sun. There were some bad apples, but they did not make up the majority? Enter the Appraisal Management Companies (AMCs) to save the day. They grew panels of appraisers from all over. All you needed was a license, insurance, a computer and a phone (so they can call you multiple times a day for updates). They were to act as a firewall between lenders and appraisers to “ward off collusion” and make things better. The AMC was to MANAGE orders and place them with the appraisers, make sure that appraiser independence is fully enforced, and to act as third-party affiliates of banks. This was governments way to “fix” things, although the real broken aspect of the process were the banks and lenders themselves and we all know how nothing happened to them. So where am I going with this? I’m headed to the part where you, the consumer is being cheated and overpaying.

Remember how consumers once knew the cost of the appraisal up front and who the payment was made to? Do you know this information with confidence today? Do you know for sure that all that money you paid for the appraisal is going to the appraiser for their services?

If you said yes, the answer is, actually no. No one is being honest with consumers about this aspect of the mortgage loan process. In fact, lenders and their AMCs make it a requirement that appraisers can’t discuss the fee with you, much less include an invoice with your appraisal.

In short, the fee you pay for an appraisal, with your money, is not going where you thought it was and I’m writing this to help consumers dig deeper into the representations being made to them.

Say you pay the bank $550 for an appraisal up front. You paid the fee to the lender or AMC thinking this is how much the appraisal costs. I would think that as well but this is an example of what is actually happening.

Here are a couple examples. These examples come from various appraisers around the country.

Example #1

In this example the Appraisal management company charged the borrower $1,150.00for the appraisal. The Appraiser who is doing the work is only paid $500.00, while a mysterious profit of $650 is kept by the AMC for managing the order. The Appraiser who carries the ultimate liability is making less than the managing middle man AMC, and they have gotten rich doing this. As a borrower, you just paid an extra $650 out of your pocket for an appraisal that cost $500. Sound fair and honest? This makes me sick! Actually it makes me sad.

Example #2

In this example which is not as extreme as the first one, the AMC charged the borrower $500 for the appraisal. The Appraiser was paid $259.00 for once again doing all the work and carrying all the liability, while the AMC made $241. With this example, I can almost for certain say that this fee paid to the appraiser is well below a fair and customary market rate for an appraisal, but AMCs wanting to maximize their profit find appraisers to work for much less. It represents perfectly how AMCS search for appraisers (who could be from very far away and not understand your market) to take work for less so that they can pocket more.

Example #3

With this example I need to clear some things up. First, this is an appraisal order for a typical appraisal plus additional forms. In my area, the reasonable fee would be at least $500 for a similar product. As you can see the AMC has charged a total of $545.00 and decided that a product that requires more work on the appraiser’s part is worth less and that they will take $245.00 out of the fee for themselves.

I have many more examples to share but hope these shed light on what I believe to be a new issue taking from consumers by lender third party affiliates. AMCS are up charging consumers while searching and finding the cheapest and fastest appraisers to do the job, so they can profit more.

I probably know what you are thinking now. Nothing wrong with finding the cheapest. We all do this all the time to save money. Here is the difference; this was a culture created. AMCs must make money and make their shareholders more money. By pitting appraisers against each other they created a culture where work goes to the cheapest and fastest while ignoring quality, competency, knowledge and experience. Ask yourself this…are you looking for the most experienced realtor when selling your home or just the cheapest and fastest? Are you looking for the cheapest and fastest lawyer when you need one? Probably not. But at least you know what you are getting either way and you know exactly where the money is going.

Are you laughing with me now? No…..Ok.

Yes, consumers are paying what they think is a market fee for an appraisal but making the middle man rich. Why do you need to pay money to someone acting on behalf of the lender? I ask myself this question every day, which is what inspired me to write this blog. Why isn’t the lender paying this company for their services? Why are consumers paying extra money for a bank affiliate? Especially when the actual appraisal costs less than what consumers are being charged. I know this to be fact because laws in my state require me to disclose what I was compensated in the appraisal report. At least in my state when I report I was paid $450, and you were charged $550, you would know where that extra $100 went. Well, maybe not but I hope that consumers begin to ask. This my friends is called TRANSPARENCY. Shouldn’t consumers know where their money is going to? Shouldn’t you be allowed to know? Shouldn’t you have some sort of trust in your lender to know that you are going to get an experienced appraiser to appraise probably your biggest asset? If you were able to hire your own appraiser, would you look at their experience, reviews, knowledge, pricing, and at the end do an interview with them? I know I would.

Appraisers today sign so many certifications and documents, bound to USPAP (google it, it’s easier that way), state and federal regulations, as well as professional affiliations and continue to protect the public trust. But here’s the question…how is the AMC protecting the public trust?

So, what’s not in your wallet? It’s the extra money you should have left over if you were paying for the appraisal and not paying for a banks third party affiliate.

Do your homework. Ask your lender these hard questions and see what they say.